Minneapolis working-age adults (16-64)
who are employed

HOW WE'RE DOING

Working adults employed by geographic region

Overall:  71% of Minneapolis residents age 16 to 64 are employed (2009-11).
Gap:  38 percentage points separate the share of white (highest) and American Indian (lowest) adults who are working. No statistically significant change occurred from last year’s report to this year.  


MEASUREMENT USED

Percentage of the entire typical working age (16-64) population.[1] This is a broader, more comprehensive measure of workforce participation than the official unemployment rate, which does not consider discouraged workers or others not actively seeking work as among the “unemployed.”

Working adults who are employed by race

[1]   Due to small sample size and margins of error, change between the initial and current reports is not statistically significant.

[1]   Excluding those actively serving in the armed forces, or living in institutions or group quarters (such as college dormitories). This measure doesn't capture whether workers are employed full- or part-time, receive depressed wages for their work, work in a position suited to their education, or are otherwise underemployed.

HOW WE'RE DOING

Chart of typical working-age population that is employed


Overall: 
72% of Minneapolis residents age 16 to 64 are employed (2008-10).

Gap: 39 percentage points separate the share of white (highest) and American Indian (lowest) adults who are working. From last year’s report to this year, no statistically significant change occurred.[1][2]



[1]   Excluding those actively serving in the armed forces, or living in institutions or group quarters (such as college dormitories). This measure doesn't capture whether workers are employed full- or part-time, receive depressed wages for their work, work in a position suited to their education, or are otherwise underemployed.

[2]   Due to small sample size and margins of error, change between the initial and current reports is not statistically significant.

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, decennial census and American Community Survey; data by race/ethnicity tabulated by Wilder Research from Steven Ruggles, Matthew Sobek, Trent Alexander, Catherine A. Fitch, Ronald Goeken, Patricia Kelly Hall, Miriam King, and Chad Ronnander. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 4.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Population Center [producer and distributor], 2010.

Chart of working-age adults that are employed, by race

KEY OBSERVATIONS

  • Of 282,500 working-age adults in Minneapolis, 71 percent are employed. The change since the first oneMinneapolis report (2006-08 data) constitutes a statistically significant decline in the share of adults who are working, from 73 percent to 71 percent.
  • This decline reflects the economic down turn, but also represents the lowest share of adults working since at least 1990.
  • Among U.S. metropolitan areas, the Twin Cities has one of the highest overall rates of adults working. However, compared to major metropolitan areas nationwide, it also has one of the largest gaps in employment between whites and certain populations of color, especially U.S.-born Blacks and American Indians. These “employment gaps” or difference by race in the shares of working-age adults who are employed, are large gaps in the region and are also apparent in the city of Minneapolis, as well.
  • In Minneapolis, the racial gap in workforce participation rates is nearly 38 percentage points between the highest (white, 77%) and lowest (American Indian, 39%) rates.
  • Of the more than 44,000 foreign-born adults in Minneapolis, 63 percent are employed. Foreign-born Black Minneapolis residents tend to have higher shares of workforce participation than U.S.-born Blacks, while the differences in nativity are less for Asian and Hispanic adults, for whom the share working for both foreign and U.S. born are within one percentage point of each other.

OBSERVATIONS FROM THE MAPS

  • The highest shares of employed working-age adults live in southwest Minneapolis. North Minneapolis and the area around the University of Minnesota are areas with lower shares of employed working-age adults.
  • Of the 116 census tracts in the city, 44 tracts (38%) have a share of adults working below that of the city. Just 6 tracts have fewer than half of the working-age population employed and an additional 38 tracts have between 50 and 71 percent employed. 
  • Many areas with low shares of adults working are also areas with high child poverty. However, there are also areas with a high share of employed adults of color and a high share of children of color in poverty. As an example, compare the area around 35W for the proportion of adults of color working and the share of children of color in poverty (p. 39).  

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, decennial census and American Community Survey; data by race/ethnicity tabulated by Wilder Research from Steven Ruggles, Matthew Sobek, Trent Alexander, Catherine A. Fitch, Ronald Goeken, Patricia Kelly Hall, Miriam King, and Chad Ronnander. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 4.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Population Center [producer and distributor], 2010.

 

MAPS
POPULATION OF ADULTS WORKING - ALL

POPULATION OF ADULTS OF COLOR VS. WHITE ADULTS


All Community Indicators