Fourth Generation Awards $50,000 in Mental Health Grants

Fourth Generation, a program of The Minneapolis Foundation that brings together emerging philanthropists, has awarded $50,000 in grants to seven local organizations that provide mental health services.

Members of Fourth Generation work together to learn the skills of strategic giving and pool their resources to make a much bigger difference in the community than they could alone. Every year, they vote to choose an issue, research it together, donate and fundraise to support it, then make grants to local nonprofits. This year, the group chose to focus on mental health.

“This is a topic that touches all of us,” said Julia Quanrud, chair of Fourth Generation. “The need for mental health services is overwhelming, it’s underfunded, and there’s a lot of great work being done to address these issues by organizations in Minnesota.”

This year’s Fourth Generation grants are as follows:

  • $8,000 to the Ars Bellum Foundation to fund the purchase and implementation of a scalable, mobile IT system that will link their art therapists together and manage clinic records so they can bill health insurance companies for services and expand their capacity.
  • $4,000 to Guadalupe Alternative Programs for their school-based mental health services and hiring a part-time mental health behavioral aide from the Karen community to assist with growing needs in that population.
  • $10,000 to Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center in support of the Nokomis Endaad Elder in Residence staff position. This position provides culturally grounded recovery support and traditional counseling to adult American Indian women participating in the Nokomis Endaad outpatient chemical dependency treatment program.
  • $10,000 to myHealth for Teens & Young Adults to partially fund two part-time counselors and increase the number of individual counseling sessions they will be able to provide by 15%.
  • $4,000 to Vail Place for their Clubhouse Community Support Program, which provides a wide range resources for people with serious and persistent mental illness.
  • $10,000 to the Walk-In Counseling Center for general operating support, which will enable them to provide free, anonymous, easy-to-access mental health counseling for people who need timely care.
  • $4,000 to the Washburn Center for Children to provide comprehensive day treatment services that will help high-risk children ages three to nine in the Minneapolis school district develop the social, emotional, and behavioral skills they need to be successful in school and at home.

The Minneapolis Foundation runs Fourth Generation to help ensure that future generations have the tools they need to carry on Minnesota’s tradition of generosity and make positive change in the community. In the past six years, the group has granted nearly $225,000 to address critical issues, including youth homelessness, food justice, small business development, and services for aging Minnesotans. Learn more about Fourth Generation >

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